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  • Writer's pictureDWC

How to Get Married in Indiana

Most central Indiana counties no longer provides "courthouse" or "justice of the peace" weddings at their county buildings. You still have to apply and get your marriage license from your local county clerk's office, but you now have to go somewhere else to get it signed. There are a few counties that still provide this serve, but they are booked out for months.


RULES:

  • You can not be intoxicated or under the influence while signing your marriage license.

  • We can sign any Indiana county's marriage license, but we can not sign any out of state marriage license.

  • A marriage license is valid for 60 days from the date it is issued, and couples can be married as early as the same day.

  • Couples who do not marry within the 60 days must apply for a new license before marrying and pay the filing fee again.

  • You have 30 days after your wedding day to return your marriage license by mail or in person to make it legal. We recommend taking it back to the county clerk's office in order to request your certified copies while you are there.

MARION COUNTY RESIDENTS:

To be legally married, a couple must first obtain a marriage license. To obtain a marriage license, you must first complete an online marriage license application (https://mycourts.in.gov/mlpublic/), complete your appointment in the office or virtually, and then have an Officiant sign your marriage license. For us to sign your marriage license, you must bring a valid marriage license from the State of Indiana and photo identification.


NON-MARION COUNTY RESIDENTS:

For Indiana residents, the marriage license must be obtained in the county in which one of the applicants reside, and the ceremony can take place anywhere in Indiana. Out-of-state visitors planning to marry in Marion County must apply for their license in the Marion County Clerk’s Office (https://mycourts.in.gov/mlpublic/).


WHO CAN BE AN OFFICIANT:

The following individuals may serve as an officiant at your wedding:

  • Member of the clergy of a religious organization, such as a minister of the gospel, a priest, a bishop, an archbishop, a rabbi, or an imam

  • Member of a certified secular organization

  • Judge

  • Mayor, within the mayor’s county

  • Clerk or a clerk-treasurer of a city or town, within a county in which the city or town is located

  • Clerk of the district court

  • Governor or lieutenant governor

  • Member of the general assembly

At Diamond Wedding Chapel, all packages come with an officiant or you can bring your own at no additional cost.



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